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Census Tips: 1860 Census

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The 1860 census was the eighth federal census. Census day was June 1, 1860. Information collected in 1860 was almost identical to 1850. In the ten years between 1850 and 1860, two new states were created: Minnesota in 1858 and Oregon the following year. There were also several territories in 1860. New Mexico (which included Arizona) and Utah (included parts of Nevada and Colorado) territories were included in 1850. New territories in the 1860 census include the following: Kansas (includes area that became Colorado), Nebraska (includes parts of the area that became Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming), Indian Territory (present-day Oklahoma, the enumeration of non-American Indians), and Washington (created when Oregon became a state, included parts of what became Idaho, western Montana and northwest Wyoming). All North Carolina counties that existed in 1860 were enumerated and there are no missing records.

Map of NC showing county borders. Text: North Carolina 1860

 

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New @NCpedia: Learn about local educational and civil rights leaders in Pitt County and read a new biography of Henry Eppes, member of the 1868 “Black Caucus”

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New @NCpedia: Learn about local educational and civil rights leaders in Pitt County and read a new biography of Henry Eppes, member of the 1868 “Black Caucus”

NCpedia is pleased to share some of its newest content. These are new biographical entries about education and civil rights leaders in Pitt County and a biographical entry on Henry Eppes.

W.H. Davenport standing in front of Greenville, N.C.'s C. M. Eppes High School, January 19, 1961. Item 741.26.a44, from the Daily Reflector Image Collection, East Carolina University Digital Collections.

W.H. Davenport standing in front of Greenville, N.C.’s C. M. Eppes High School, January 19, 1961. Item 741.26.a44, from the Daily Reflector Image Collection, East Carolina University Digital Collections.

Henry Eppes was a North Carolina state legislator who was a member of the 1868 “Black Caucus” as a delegate to the state constitutional convention. He was also a delegate to the Freedmen’s Convention of 1866.

These entries share stories specific to Greenville and Pitt County.  At the same time, the local history they provide illustrates many of the themes and currents of the history of North Carolina and the nation.

These entries appear in NCpedia thanks to one of our newest contributors, Steven Hill. Steven is a high school history teacher in Greenville, North Carolina public schools. He has  a passion for researching and sharing history, especially the educational and civil rights history of his home county. Thank you, Steven, for sharing your work and these important histories with NCpedia viewers!

New @Ncpedia: D.D. Garrett and his wife Clotea on December 5, 1988. Taking the oath of office as the first Black County Commissioner. From the Michael Garrett Family private collection. Used in NCpedia by permission.

New @Ncpedia: D.D. Garrett and his wife Clotea on December 5, 1988. Taking the oath of office as the first Black County Commissioner. From the Michael Garrett Family private collection. Used in NCpedia by permission.

Please visit these entries to learn more:

Willis Haynie Davenport — African American educational leader: http://www.ncpedia.org/davenport-willis-haynie

Henry Eppes — North Carolina state legislator and member of the 1868 “Black Caucus”:  http://www.ncpedia.org/eppes-henry

Charles Montgomery Eppes — noted African American educational leader and son of Henry Eppes: http://www.ncpedia.org/eppes-charles-montgomery

Denison Dover Garrett — African American civil rights pioneer, NCCAP leader, civic leader, and Greenville businessman: http://www.ncpedia.org/garrett-denison-dover

Junius Harris Rose — Superintendent of Greenville Schools 1920-1967: http://www.ncpedia.org/rose-junius-harris

Do you have a topic in North Carolina history whose story might fit in NCpedia?

Please let us know!  To learn how to contribute, visit NCpedia’s Contribute page: http://www.ncpedia.org/contribute. Or contact me!

— Kelly Agan, North Carolina Government & Heritage Library

 

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Census Tips: 1850 Census

NC county boundaries in 1850
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The 1850 census was the seventh federal census. Census day was June 1, 1850. Census day is when gathering information for the census began. All information was for the previous year ending on that day. Several changes happened with procedures and the type of information recorded. In 1850, the Census Office was created and began operation. The enumeration continued to be taken door to door, but the duties of the newly formed office was to collect the returns for each state and prepare reports. Until 1902 when the Census Office became its own federal agency, the office would disband after each enumeration was complete and form again in order to prepare for the next census in ten years.

NC county boundaries during the 1850 census

In addition to the original census schedule, two other copies were made. One copy was  given to the Secretary of State for each state or territory. Another copy was given to each county court for that county’s enumeration. It is important to keep that in mind while looking at the 1850 census and beyond. You may be looking at an  image of the original, but you might be looking at a copy, or even a copy of the copy. This presents a lot of room for human error.

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City Directories: Mapping Ancestors

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The topic today focuses on using information in city directories for mapping ancestors. By the term mapping ancestors, I am referring to using a variety of maps to help pinpoint where your ancestors lived using different types of maps.

Since December 2016, I have discussed using City Directories for your research.  Previous posts in this series are:

Also, in June, I talked about Sanborn maps, which is relevant to today’s post.

Although today’s post is about using information in city directories, you can also apply the same methods for mapping ancestors using census, or possibly tax, information. However, this will only work if you have their address. City directories work very well for mapping your ancestors because they give addresses for those who are listed and the street directory gives information on the owner of the home. As with past posts in the series, I’ll continue using information on the Pettiford family.

Let’s get started….

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This blog is a service of the State Library of North Carolina, part of the NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. Blog comments and posts may be subject to Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.