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New @NCpedia: Learn about local educational and civil rights leaders in Pitt County and read a new biography of Henry Eppes, member of the 1868 “Black Caucus”

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New @NCpedia: Learn about local educational and civil rights leaders in Pitt County and read a new biography of Henry Eppes, member of the 1868 “Black Caucus”

NCpedia is pleased to share some of its newest content. These are new biographical entries about education and civil rights leaders in Pitt County and a biographical entry on Henry Eppes.

W.H. Davenport standing in front of Greenville, N.C.'s C. M. Eppes High School, January 19, 1961. Item 741.26.a44, from the Daily Reflector Image Collection, East Carolina University Digital Collections.

W.H. Davenport standing in front of Greenville, N.C.’s C. M. Eppes High School, January 19, 1961. Item 741.26.a44, from the Daily Reflector Image Collection, East Carolina University Digital Collections.

Henry Eppes was a North Carolina state legislator who was a member of the 1868 “Black Caucus” as a delegate to the state constitutional convention. He was also a delegate to the Freedmen’s Convention of 1866.

These entries share stories specific to Greenville and Pitt County.  At the same time, the local history they provide illustrates many of the themes and currents of the history of North Carolina and the nation.

These entries appear in NCpedia thanks to one of our newest contributors, Steven Hill. Steven is a high school history teacher in Greenville, North Carolina public schools. He has  a passion for researching and sharing history, especially the educational and civil rights history of his home county. Thank you, Steven, for sharing your work and these important histories with NCpedia viewers!

New @Ncpedia: D.D. Garrett and his wife Clotea on December 5, 1988. Taking the oath of office as the first Black County Commissioner. From the Michael Garrett Family private collection. Used in NCpedia by permission.

New @Ncpedia: D.D. Garrett and his wife Clotea on December 5, 1988. Taking the oath of office as the first Black County Commissioner. From the Michael Garrett Family private collection. Used in NCpedia by permission.

Please visit these entries to learn more:

Willis Haynie Davenport — African American educational leader: http://www.ncpedia.org/davenport-willis-haynie

Henry Eppes — North Carolina state legislator and member of the 1868 “Black Caucus”:  http://www.ncpedia.org/eppes-henry

Charles Montgomery Eppes — noted African American educational leader and son of Henry Eppes: http://www.ncpedia.org/eppes-charles-montgomery

Denison Dover Garrett — African American civil rights pioneer, NCCAP leader, civic leader, and Greenville businessman: http://www.ncpedia.org/garrett-denison-dover

Junius Harris Rose — Superintendent of Greenville Schools 1920-1967: http://www.ncpedia.org/rose-junius-harris

Do you have a topic in North Carolina history whose story might fit in NCpedia?

Please let us know!  To learn how to contribute, visit NCpedia’s Contribute page: http://www.ncpedia.org/contribute. Or contact me!

— Kelly Agan, North Carolina Government & Heritage Library

 

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What’s New about North Carolina in NCpedia?!

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New in NCpedia!

NCpedia has a number of fascinating new stories about North Carolina history and people. Check them out and share!

New in NCpedia: Aerial photograph of the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI), the former site of the NASA tracking station near Rosman, North Carolina. Image courtesy of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

Aerial photograph of the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI), the former site of the NASA tracking station near Rosman, North Carolina. Image courtesy of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

North Carolina in the era of space exploration

Did you know that North Carolina was home to a NASA satellite tracking facility during the peak years of the space program?  Yes, it’s true!  Check out this new entry on the site, located near Rosman, North Carolina: ncpedia.org/NASA-rosman-satellite-tracking-facility.  And on May 8 of this year, the site was recognized with the dedication of the state’s newest Highway Historical Marker (located just off NC Highway 64 near Rosman).

History of Nursing in North Carolina

NCpedia has been building a collection on the history of professional nursing in the state, along with some of the pioneering nurses that made ground-breaking history in the development of nursing education and in bringing modern healthcare to communities. Visit the collection here: ncpedia.org/category/subjects/nurses

New in NCpedia: Kellis Parker, senior year portrait, 1964. From the UNC-Chapel Hill student yearbook the <i>Yackety Yack</i>. Used by permission of University of North Carolina Libaries.

Kellis Parker, senior year portrait, 1964. From the UNC-Chapel Hill student yearbook the Yackety Yack. Used by permission of University of North Carolina Libraries.

Biography of Kellis Earl Parker, lawyer, activist, scholar, and musician

Learn about the life and accomplishments of Lenoir County native, Kellis Earl Parker.  With civil rights activism a central part of his life’s work, Parker was one of the first black students to enroll at the University of North Carolina and went on to become the first black law professor at Columbia University.  He was also an accomplished musician and brother to legendary saxophone player, Maceo Parker. ncpedia.org/parker-kellis-earl

Kelly Agan, North Carolina Government & Heritage Library

New in NCpedia: North Carolina Women

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New in NCpedia:  North Carolina Women

North Carolina Women: Portrait of North Carolina Supreme Court Chief Justice Susie Marshall Sharp. From the Waller Collection, PhC.14, collection of the State Archives of North Carolina. Used with permission.

North Carolina Women: Portrait of North Carolina Supreme Court Chief Justice Susie Marshall Sharp. From the Waller Collection, PhC.14, collection of the State Archives of North Carolina. Used with permission.

Women’s history month is rushing by!  Before it passes, NCpedia has new biographies to share on North Carolina women. These entries come us from our content partners at the University of North Carolina Libraries, the Research Branch of the North Carolina Office of Archives and History, and the North Carolina Symphony.

If you’re in for a little browsing, visit this link to all NCpedia bios about women: http://www.ncpedia.org/biography/women

New NCpedia entries:

  • Marie Watters Colton — first female speaker Pro Tempore of the NC House of Representatives.
  • Elizabeth “Libba” Nevills Cotten — Carrboro native and key figure in the 1960s folk music revival.
  • Mary Claire Engstrom — long-time Hillsborough resident and instrumental in founding the town’s Historical Society and chronicling the history of Orange County.
  • Mary Nicholson — Early female commercial pilot from Greensboro, joined the British Air Transport Auxiliary during WWII.
  • Anne Penland — from Asheville, Penland became a pioneering nurse anesthetist and was the first women to serve as an anesthetist on the European front in WWI, in a British base hospital.
  • Susie Marshall Sharp — ground-breaking first female judge in the state’s history, first female member of the State Supreme Court and its first female Chief Justice.
  • Maxine Swallin — along with her husband, Benjamin Swallin, she helped revive the floundering North Carolina Symphony in the 1930s.

–Kelly Agan, Government & Heritage Library

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Two African American Newspapers Newly Available Online – Baltimore Afro-American & Norfolk Journal and Guide

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The Government and Heritage Library has two African American newspapers newly available for online research: The Baltimore Afro-American and The Norfolk Journal and Guide! Both newspapers are accessible through the ProQuest Historical Newspapers database.

Currently, these databases are available on site AND to North Carolina state agency employees anywhere with their State Library card. Users may perform keyword and advanced searches as well as browse by publication year, month, and issue number.

The Baltimore Afro-American – Coverage: 1893 – 1988

Provides full text and citation/abstract coverage from April 29, 1893 to February 6, 1988, with some exceptions. This weekly newspaper is published in Baltimore, Maryland, and is still in print with current issues available at www.afro.com.

From the newspaper’s Facebook page (accessed 2017-02-24):

The Afro-American Newspaper was founded in 1892 by John Henry Murphy Sr., a former slave, when he combined his church newspaper “The Sunday School Helper” with two other Baltimore newspapers. Murphy led his newspaper to national fame by the time of his death in 1922, when it was led by his son Carl Murphy, who headed the paper for 45 years and established 13 national editions. Many prominent Black journalists and writers have worked for the Afro-American, including William Worthy, J. Saunders Redding, and Langston Hughes. It remains in the Murphy family, today led by publisher John Oliver.

Other reading about the history of the Baltimore Afro-American can be found here: PBS – Newspaper Biographies: The Afro-American

The Norfolk Journal and Guide – Coverage: 1916 – 2003

Provides full text and citation/abstract coverage from September 30, 1916 – December 30, 2003, with some exceptions. This paper was published in Norfolk, Virginia, and was founded on April 14, 1900. It is still printed today with new issues available at thenewjournalandguide.com.

From the newspaper’s Facebook page (accessed 2017-02-24):

The New Journal and Guide is Virginia’s oldest Black weekly newspaper and part of what makes Norfolk great. Now celebrating more than 100 years of continuous publication, we are a proud member of the African American Press comprising some 300 newspapers across the nation.

Other reading about the history of the Norfolk Journal and Guide can be found here: PBS – Newspaper Biographies: Norfolk Journal and Guide

Questions about these resources or researching at the Government and Heritage Library? Please feel free to email us at slnc.reference[at]ncdcr[dot]gov or call 919-807-7450!

This blog is a service of the State Library of North Carolina, part of the NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. Blog comments and posts may be subject to Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.