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New Additions: Genealogy – Heritage of Border States

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Find out about new additions to the collections of the Government and Heritage Library. When researching North Carolina families, county histories from neighboring states can reveal clues, or answers, about a family’s origins or  final destination.  

patriotdayCumberland County Virginia and Its People, Vol. 2, Cumberland County Historical Society. Formed in 1749, Cumberland County, Virginia is located approximately 100 miles north of Vance County, North Carolina. This second  volume, begun in 2009,  updates the family histories presented in the first volume and adds new ones.  Included are brief biographical sketches for individuals and family names plus histories of important places, and a county cemetery survey. The library  owns the earlier volume and its four supplements and all are available to researchers.

 

 

 

 

Scan0069Monroe County Tennessee Heritage, 1819-1997,  Moore County Heritage Book Committee. This book presents the history and heritage of Monroe County, Tennessee, which is located approximately 60 miles northwest of the town of Murphy, North Carolina close to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. It includes information about Cherokee culture, important places, cultural sites, communities, towns, sports, government, education, individuals, and families. Vintage photographs bring the family and individual histories to life.

 

 

 

 

 

Genealogy materials are available on-site at the Government and Heritage Library or may be borrowed through an inter-library loan request at your local public library. To view other new library acquisitions, click here.

New Additions: Imprisoned

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Find out about new additions to the collections of the Government and Heritage Library:

aintscaredAin’t Scared of Your Jail: Arrest, Imprisonment, and the Civil Rights Movement, by Zoe Colley. This book describes the incarceration experiences of civil rights activists in the mid 20th century, a time when arrest became a way to expose the evils of segregation and jail was seen as a way to further the cause. The various attitudes towards arrest and imprisonment and the influence of demographic factors are examined along with the impact of imprisonment on the civil rights movement as a whole.

 

 

 

 

 

 

captivesCaptives in Blue: The Civil War Prisons of the Confederacy, by Roger Pickenpaugh. The author thoroughly details life in Confederate-run prisons examining variations in policies and practices at different prison camps and their effects on Union captives. Both central government and local policies are revealed. The particularly difficult experiences and outcomes for Black Union soldiers are described.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Library materials will be available for check out at the Government and Heritage Library by North Carolina State Agency employees or may be borrowed through an interlibrary loan request at your local public library. To view other new library acquisitions, click here.

Hispanic Heritage Month 2013

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Banner for Hispanic Heritage Month 2013

Image courtesy of the U.S. Dept. of Defense

Here we are, another year celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month. Hispanic Heritage Month (often abbreviated as HHM) runs from September 15-October 15. The reason for starting on September 15 rather than September 1 is that the countries of Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua all celebrate their independence on September 15th. Mexico celebrates on the 16th, and Chile celebrates on the 18th.

Today, I want to highlight a book in our collection for Mexican-Americans that can help them trace their ancestors back to Mexico. (more…)

The Civil War: 1864

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Find out about new additions to the collections of the Government and Heritage Library:

plot

“A Vast and Fiendish Plot”: The Confederate Attack on New York City, by Clint Johnson. In full detail, the author brings to life the history of an intrepid band of confederate officers who attempted to destroy the city of New York.  With a series of lethal fires in Manhattan’s commercial district, this bold conspiracy’s mission was to  destroy the world’s most influential metropolis. Revealed within are the shocking facts about treacherous alliances and rivalries that threatened 19th century America.

 

 

 

 

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The Battle of New Market Heights: Freedom Will be Theirs By The Sword, by James Price. This book recounts the history of how black Union soldiers attacked a heavily fortified position on the outskirts of the Confederate capital of Richmond, striking a blow against Robert E. Lee’s formidable Army. The soldiers demonstrated to detractors that they could indeed fight for their own freedom and citizenship, and do so as well for their enslaved brethren. Learn how 14 soldiers in this regiment earned the nation’s highest military honor, the Congressional Medal of Honor.

 

 

 

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Confederate Goliath: The Battle of Fort Fisher, by Rod Gragg. With spellbinding narrative, the author  presents the history of the Battle of Fort Fisher. Based on exhaustive research of official records, memoirs, diaries and letters, he captures the dramatic and compelling story of a long overlooked chapter in the history of the Civil War.

 

 

 

 

cssThe CSS Albemarle and William Cushing: The Remarkable Confederate Ironclad and the Union Officer Who Sank It, by Jim Stempel. ‘In 1864, two marvels of the Civil War collided on the Roanoke River near Plymouth, North Carolina. The first was the formidable Confederate ironclad Albemarle, a 376 ton behemoth that roamed the nearby rivers and waters of Albemarle Sound, defeating everything the Federal Navy could throw at it. The second was William B. Cushing, a 21 year old Union naval lieutenant who had been selected to lead a virtual suicide mission to destroy the ironclad. This fully documented chronicle of the young officer’s “David vs. Goliath” victory … is a tale of blood, courage, and desperate battle.’

 

 

 

Library materials will be available for check out at the Government and Heritage Library by North Carolina State Agency employees or may be borrowed through an interlibrary loan request at your local public library. To view other new library acquisitions, click here.

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