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Theme of the Month

Hispanic Heritage Month 2013

Banner for Hispanic Heritage Month 2013

Image courtesy of the U.S. Dept. of Defense

Here we are, another year celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month. Hispanic Heritage Month (often abbreviated as HHM) runs from September 15-October 15. The reason for starting on September 15 rather than September 1 is that the countries of Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua all celebrate their independence on September 15th. Mexico celebrates on the 16th, and Chile celebrates on the 18th.

Today, I want to highlight a book in our collection for Mexican-Americans that can help them trace their ancestors back to Mexico. (more…)

The Civil War: 1864

Find out about new additions to the collections of the Government and Heritage Library:

plot

“A Vast and Fiendish Plot”: The Confederate Attack on New York City, by Clint Johnson. In full detail, the author brings to life the history of an intrepid band of confederate officers who attempted to destroy the city of New York.  With a series of lethal fires in Manhattan’s commercial district, this bold conspiracy’s mission was to  destroy the world’s most influential metropolis. Revealed within are the shocking facts about treacherous alliances and rivalries that threatened 19th century America.

 

 

 

 

 battle

The Battle of New Market Heights: Freedom Will be Theirs By The Sword, by James Price. This book recounts the history of how black Union soldiers attacked a heavily fortified position on the outskirts of the Confederate capital of Richmond, striking a blow against Robert E. Lee’s formidable Army. The soldiers demonstrated to detractors that they could indeed fight for their own freedom and citizenship, and do so as well for their enslaved brethren. Learn how 14 soldiers in this regiment earned the nation’s highest military honor, the Congressional Medal of Honor.

 

 

 

goliath

 

Confederate Goliath: The Battle of Fort Fisher, by Rod Gragg. With spellbinding narrative, the author  presents the history of the Battle of Fort Fisher. Based on exhaustive research of official records, memoirs, diaries and letters, he captures the dramatic and compelling story of a long overlooked chapter in the history of the Civil War.

 

 

 

 

cssThe CSS Albemarle and William Cushing: The Remarkable Confederate Ironclad and the Union Officer Who Sank It, by Jim Stempel. ‘In 1864, two marvels of the Civil War collided on the Roanoke River near Plymouth, North Carolina. The first was the formidable Confederate ironclad Albemarle, a 376 ton behemoth that roamed the nearby rivers and waters of Albemarle Sound, defeating everything the Federal Navy could throw at it. The second was William B. Cushing, a 21 year old Union naval lieutenant who had been selected to lead a virtual suicide mission to destroy the ironclad. This fully documented chronicle of the young officer’s “David vs. Goliath” victory … is a tale of blood, courage, and desperate battle.’

 

 

 

Library materials will be available for check out at the Government and Heritage Library by North Carolina State Agency employees or may be borrowed through an interlibrary loan request at your local public library. To view other new library acquisitions, click here.

Mary Chesnut’s Civil War

Find out about new additions to the collections of the Government and Heritage Library:

chesnut Mary Chesnut’s Civil War, by Mary Boykin Miller Chesnut and edited by C. Vann Woodard. This book was awarded a Pulitzer Prize in history. The writings of Mary Chesnut (who lived from 1823-1886) have been described as ‘one of the best firsthand records of the Confederate experience ‘ and ‘one of the half dozen or so most important diaries in all literature; if you will, a southern War and Peace.’

 

 

 

 

 

chesnut2 The Private Mary Chestnut: the Unpublished Civil War Diaries,  by Mary BoykinMiller Chesnut, edited by C. Vann Wood and Elisabeth Muhlenfeld. ‘The ideal diarist, Mary Chesnut was at the right place at the right time with the right connections.’ The daughter and wife of senators, and neighbor and family friend of Jefferson Davis, she was both outspoken and independent. Her writings bring to life a most vivid account of the end of the Confederacy.

 

 

 

Library materials will be available for check out at the Government and Heritage Library by North Carolina State Agency employees or may be borrowed through an interlibrary loan request at your local public library. To view other new library acquisitions, click here.

NC Government Publication Named Notable of 2012 by Library Journal

AccessNC

 

ACCESS North Carolina: A Vacation and Travel Guide for People with Disabilities was recently named by Library Journal as one of the notable government documents for 2012.

ACCESS North Carolina mixes text and icons to offer basic tourist site data on nearly 400 different locations throughout North Carolina. Users can tell at a glance if a site is accessible or partially accessible for persons with ­disabilities. In addition to benefiting people with disabilities, the information in ACCESS North Carolina can also benefit people who are aging, and parents with child and infant strollers.

ACCESS North Carolina was produced by the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services, a division of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services .

To read the complete Library Journal article go to here.  To see the listing for ACCESS North Carolina, scroll down the article to State and Local, and then to North Carolina.

 

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