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FAQ: My ancestor was born in NC and raised in GA. Who were his parents?

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a group of question marksI often receive questions like this. Sometimes patrons will see on census records a birth place of NC, but the person lived most of his life in another place. It is so tempting when we see new information for an ancestor that we just want to jump forward in our research and find out more. Sometimes in these situations, patrons don’t know anything about who the parents are and have only seen records of the ancestor in question as an adult; they have not yet identified the parents. It is easy to assume that once you know the birth place, you can find the parents, but that is not often the case.

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NC County of the Week: Richmond County

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Map of North Carolina, Richmond County hi-lited in green, from NCpedia.org

Map of North Carolina, Richmond County hi-lited in green, from NCpedia.org

This Week’s NC County of the Week: Richmond County

This week we’ll share snapshots of  Richmond County’s stories and people, resources and documentary collections, and tips for researching the county’s history.

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter using the hashtag #nccotw and be sure to check our Pinterest board for the county’s history in pictures.

Located in the southern Piedmont and bordering South Carolina, Richmond County was formed in 1789, one of 10 counties formed in North Carolina the same year during the American Revolution.

Richmond County Courthouse, Rockingham, NC. Image from North Carolina Postcards. Used courtesy of the North Carolina Collection, Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill.

Richmond County Courthouse, Rockingham, NC. Image from North Carolina Postcards. Used courtesy of the North Carolina Collection, Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill.

Richmond County was named for Charles Lennox, the Third duke of Richmond, a British military officer and Whig politician who was known to be sympathetic to the American colonies.

The county seat was originally called Richmond Courthouse and changed to Rockingham in 1785 to honor Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham, Whig and two-time Prime Minister who was outspoken in his opposition to the Crown and Pariliament’s policies that lead to the American Revolution.

 

Follow Government and Heritage Library, part of the State Library of North Carolina’s board Richmond County, North Carolina on Pinterest.

New Content in NCpedia, North Carolina’s Online Encyclopedia

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Check out new content in NCpedia, North Carolina’s Online Encyclopedia!

North Carolina African American History (from the Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History)

Black Wall Street, Durham, NC

Gregory Normal Institute

The Osborne Giles Foard Home near Cleveland, N.C. where Peter Stewart Ney lived and died. Image used courtesy of the North Carolina Museum of History, North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources.

The Osborne Giles Foard Home near Cleveland, N.C. where Peter Stewart Ney lived and died. Image used courtesy of the North Carolina Museum of History, North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources.

North Carolina Myths and Legends (from the Tar Heel Junior Historian magazineNC Museum of History)

The “Duke of Asheville”

Three Sisters

The Mysterious Mr. Ney

North Carolina Sports Legends (from the GHL)

Christian Adolph “Sonny” Jurgensen, Legendary Pro Quarterback

Free Genealogy Workshop: Using Private Collections for Genealogical Research

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Using Private Collections for Genealogical Research

August 22, 2015, 10-11a.m.

Join us for a free genealogy workshop presented by the North Carolina Government and Heritage Library and the State Archives of North Carolina.

Bullard Family Bible Records

Hand drawn family tree, Bullard Family Bible Records, State Archives of North Carolina.

Materials such as family papers, church and organizational records can be valuable resources when conducting genealogical research. Join us as we discuss private collections, what kinds of information you can find and the holdings of the North Carolina Government and Heritage Library and State Archives of North Carolina.

Program will be held at the Archives/State Library Building
109 E. Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina.

To register or for more information please call (919)807-7450 or email slnc.reference@ncdcr.gov.

This blog is a service of the State Library of North Carolina, part of the NC Department of Cultural Resources. Blog comments and posts may be subject to Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.