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African American History

Two African American Newspapers Newly Available Online – Baltimore Afro-American & Norfolk Journal and Guide

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The Government and Heritage Library has two African American newspapers newly available for online research: The Baltimore Afro-American and The Norfolk Journal and Guide! Both newspapers are accessible through the ProQuest Historical Newspapers database.

Currently, these databases are available on site AND to North Carolina state agency employees anywhere with their State Library card. Users may perform keyword and advanced searches as well as browse by publication year, month, and issue number.

The Baltimore Afro-American – Coverage: 1893 – 1988

Provides full text and citation/abstract coverage from April 29, 1893 to February 6, 1988, with some exceptions. This weekly newspaper is published in Baltimore, Maryland, and is still in print with current issues available at www.afro.com.

From the newspaper’s Facebook page (accessed 2017-02-24):

The Afro-American Newspaper was founded in 1892 by John Henry Murphy Sr., a former slave, when he combined his church newspaper “The Sunday School Helper” with two other Baltimore newspapers. Murphy led his newspaper to national fame by the time of his death in 1922, when it was led by his son Carl Murphy, who headed the paper for 45 years and established 13 national editions. Many prominent Black journalists and writers have worked for the Afro-American, including William Worthy, J. Saunders Redding, and Langston Hughes. It remains in the Murphy family, today led by publisher John Oliver.

Other reading about the history of the Baltimore Afro-American can be found here: PBS – Newspaper Biographies: The Afro-American

The Norfolk Journal and Guide – Coverage: 1916 – 2003

Provides full text and citation/abstract coverage from September 30, 1916 – December 30, 2003, with some exceptions. This paper was published in Norfolk, Virginia, and was founded on April 14, 1900. It is still printed today with new issues available at thenewjournalandguide.com.

From the newspaper’s Facebook page (accessed 2017-02-24):

The New Journal and Guide is Virginia’s oldest Black weekly newspaper and part of what makes Norfolk great. Now celebrating more than 100 years of continuous publication, we are a proud member of the African American Press comprising some 300 newspapers across the nation.

Other reading about the history of the Norfolk Journal and Guide can be found here: PBS – Newspaper Biographies: Norfolk Journal and Guide

Questions about these resources or researching at the Government and Heritage Library? Please feel free to email us at slnc.reference[at]ncdcr[dot]gov or call 919-807-7450!

New additions to NCpedia: African American History and Civil Rights in North Carolina

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"Don't Buy In Down Town Williamston!". Image of boycott poster from 1963-1964 civil rights campaign and protests in Williamston, N.C., 1963-1964. By the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Item 421.27.l, from East Carolina University Digital Collections.

“Don’t Buy In Down Town Williamston!”. Image of boycott poster from 1963-1964 civil rights campaign and protests in Williamston, N.C., 1963-1964. By the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Item 421.27.l, from East Carolina University Digital Collections.

NCpedia has new resources to share for African American History and the Civil Rights Movement in North Carolina.  Please visit NCpedia and share!

A new a collection page — Exploring North Carolina: African American History.  This collection brings together and organizes entries covering a range of topics including: biographies, history of education, businesses and industry, organizations, culture and arts, law and politics, and historic places, monuments and memorials.

New articles on Civil Rights events in North Carolina:

 

Kelly Agan, North Carolina Government & Heritage Library

Mystery Solved: New Bern census of 1863

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In early January, I received a question from a patron via email regarding information in an NCpedia article about Union Volunteer Regiments in North Carolina during the Civil War. In the article, it states that an 1863 census of the freed black population of New Bern was 8,500. The patron wanted to know if the census listed them by name and also the location. In order to find out if they listed them by name, I needed to find out where the census was located. Since this question was related to 2 other research projects I’m working on, I took a lot more time than usual to find this information. It was a 3 week journey with a lot of twists and turns and surprising finds! My intent is to use this as an example of how to follow sources back to the original.

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State Doc Pick of the Week : African Americans in early North Carolina : a documentary history

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AAinearlyNCIn honor of Black History Month, our State Doc Pick of the Week posts all throughout February will focus on African American related state documents. Published by the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources Office of Archives and History, this document gives an overview of the history of African Americans in North Carolina. The introduction provides a brief history of slavery in the world, specifically North Carolina, and the remainder of the document traces the history, travel, hopes, and triumphs of African Americans (slave and free) from early North Carolina to the end of the 18th century. This document has limited access and can only be accessed in the State Library of North Carolina Reading Room. So stop by the State Library and take a look at this interesting document here!

This blog is a service of the State Library of North Carolina, part of the NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. Blog comments and posts may be subject to Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.