GHL Blog Rotating Header Image

census

Census Tips: 1850 Census

NC county boundaries in 1850
Share Button

The 1850 census was the seventh federal census. Census day was June 1, 1850. Census day is when gathering information for the census began. All information was for the previous year ending on that day. Several changes happened with procedures and the type of information recorded. In 1850, the Census Office was created and began operation. The enumeration continued to be taken door to door, but the duties of the newly formed office was to collect the returns for each state and prepare reports. Until 1902 when the Census Office became its own federal agency, the office would disband after each enumeration was complete and form again in order to prepare for the next census in ten years.

NC county boundaries during the 1850 census

In addition to the original census schedule, two other copies were made. One copy was  given to the Secretary of State for each state or territory. Another copy was given to each county court for that county’s enumeration. It is important to keep that in mind while looking at the 1850 census and beyond. You may be looking at an  image of the original, but you might be looking at a copy, or even a copy of the copy. This presents a lot of room for human error.

(more…)

Census Tips: Mortality Schedule

Share Button

Mortality schedule of the 1850-1880 census

The Mortality schedule of the U.S. Federal Census was very useful to genealogists. Many states, including North Carolina, did not issue death certificates until the 1900s. The mortality schedule may in some cases allow you to find a death date. Although only enumerating four years, if your ancestor happened to die and was enumerated, the schedule can be a great substitute of a death certificate.

entries on a 1850 Morality Schedule of NC

entries from the Bladen County, NC 1850 mortality schedule page 49

The people who appear in the schedules died within the year prior to census day, which was June 1st for 1850-1880. Only those whose death was recorded died between June 1st of the previous year and May 30th of the current year.  If a death is dated between June and December, it occurred in the preceding year (i.e., 1849, 1859, 1869, or 1879, depending on the year of the mortality schedule it appears in). If the month of death is listed as sometime between January and May, they are for the current year (i.e., 1850, 1860, 1870, or 1880, depending on the year of the mortality schedule).

(more…)

Census Tips: 1840 Census

Share Button
Map of North Carolina during the 1840 census

Image courtesy of LEARN NC.

 

The 1840 census began June 1st and ended February 1st of 1841. Information given was as of the census day, not the day of enumeration. In cases like this, the census may have been enumerated on December 1st with an age given as 12, but that age was as of June 1, 1840, so it’s possible there was a birthday between the census day and the date of enumeration.

As in 1830, the 1840 census had a printed form for enumerators to use. Unlike other years, there were no missing census pages for any state. Also, a new state and territory were included: Iowa and the Wisconsin Territory. Although Oregon became a territory by 1840, it was not included.

(more…)

Census Tips: 1830 Census

Share Button

Map of county boundaries of NC during the 1830 census The census day of the 1830 census occurred on June 1st and twelve months were allowed to complete the census. Information given was as of the census day, not the day of enumeration. In cases like this, the census may have been enumerated on  December 1st with an age given as 12, but that age was as of June 1, 1830, so it’s possible there was a birthday between the census day and the date of enumeration.

The 1830 census was the first to have a printed form for enumerators to use. Not only that, but there were two copies. After the census was finished, one copy went to Washington, D.C. while the other copy went to the clerk of the district court. Because of problems with missing pages with earlier censuses, the senate wanted to ensure that they would not have missing records. In some cases, copies that went to D.C. went missing and copies from the clerks of district courts were sent to replace them. The copies in D.C. were the only ones transferred to the National Archives.

(more…)

This blog is a service of the State Library of North Carolina, part of the NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. Blog comments and posts may be subject to Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.