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New @NCpedia: Learn about local educational and civil rights leaders in Pitt County and read a new biography of Henry Eppes, member of the 1868 “Black Caucus”

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New @NCpedia: Learn about local educational and civil rights leaders in Pitt County and read a new biography of Henry Eppes, member of the 1868 “Black Caucus”

NCpedia is pleased to share some of its newest content. These are new biographical entries about education and civil rights leaders in Pitt County and a biographical entry on Henry Eppes.

W.H. Davenport standing in front of Greenville, N.C.'s C. M. Eppes High School, January 19, 1961. Item 741.26.a44, from the Daily Reflector Image Collection, East Carolina University Digital Collections.

W.H. Davenport standing in front of Greenville, N.C.’s C. M. Eppes High School, January 19, 1961. Item 741.26.a44, from the Daily Reflector Image Collection, East Carolina University Digital Collections.

Henry Eppes was a North Carolina state legislator who was a member of the 1868 “Black Caucus” as a delegate to the state constitutional convention. He was also a delegate to the Freedmen’s Convention of 1866.

These entries share stories specific to Greenville and Pitt County.  At the same time, the local history they provide illustrates many of the themes and currents of the history of North Carolina and the nation.

These entries appear in NCpedia thanks to one of our newest contributors, Steven Hill. Steven is a high school history teacher in Greenville, North Carolina public schools. He has  a passion for researching and sharing history, especially the educational and civil rights history of his home county. Thank you, Steven, for sharing your work and these important histories with NCpedia viewers!

New @Ncpedia: D.D. Garrett and his wife Clotea on December 5, 1988. Taking the oath of office as the first Black County Commissioner. From the Michael Garrett Family private collection. Used in NCpedia by permission.

New @Ncpedia: D.D. Garrett and his wife Clotea on December 5, 1988. Taking the oath of office as the first Black County Commissioner. From the Michael Garrett Family private collection. Used in NCpedia by permission.

Please visit these entries to learn more:

Willis Haynie Davenport — African American educational leader: http://www.ncpedia.org/davenport-willis-haynie

Henry Eppes — North Carolina state legislator and member of the 1868 “Black Caucus”:  http://www.ncpedia.org/eppes-henry

Charles Montgomery Eppes — noted African American educational leader and son of Henry Eppes: http://www.ncpedia.org/eppes-charles-montgomery

Denison Dover Garrett — African American civil rights pioneer, NCCAP leader, civic leader, and Greenville businessman: http://www.ncpedia.org/garrett-denison-dover

Junius Harris Rose — Superintendent of Greenville Schools 1920-1967: http://www.ncpedia.org/rose-junius-harris

Do you have a topic in North Carolina history whose story might fit in NCpedia?

Please let us know!  To learn how to contribute, visit NCpedia’s Contribute page: http://www.ncpedia.org/contribute. Or contact me!

— Kelly Agan, North Carolina Government & Heritage Library

 

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New additions to NCpedia: African American History and Civil Rights in North Carolina

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"Don't Buy In Down Town Williamston!". Image of boycott poster from 1963-1964 civil rights campaign and protests in Williamston, N.C., 1963-1964. By the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Item 421.27.l, from East Carolina University Digital Collections.

“Don’t Buy In Down Town Williamston!”. Image of boycott poster from 1963-1964 civil rights campaign and protests in Williamston, N.C., 1963-1964. By the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Item 421.27.l, from East Carolina University Digital Collections.

NCpedia has new resources to share for African American History and the Civil Rights Movement in North Carolina.  Please visit NCpedia and share!

A new a collection page — Exploring North Carolina: African American History.  This collection brings together and organizes entries covering a range of topics including: biographies, history of education, businesses and industry, organizations, culture and arts, law and politics, and historic places, monuments and memorials.

New articles on Civil Rights events in North Carolina:

 

Kelly Agan, North Carolina Government & Heritage Library

New Additions: 20th Century African American History

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New additions to the collections of the Government and Heritage Library: 

Courage in the moment coverCourage in the Moment: The Civil Rights Struggle, 1961-1964, by Jim Wallace and Paul Dickson. With 100 historic photographs, both images and text in this book vividly describe the American civil rights movement.  The photographs represent the work of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill student journalist Jim Wallace from 1961-1964. Scenes depict marches, peaceful sit-ins, protests, and confrontations that occurred in North Carolina along with  visual history of the 1963 March on Washington.

Liberalism, black power, and the making of American politics coverLiberalism, Black Power, and the Making of American Politics, 1965-1980, by Devin Fergus. With a focus  on North Carolina, the author reveals the interplay between liberalism and black nationalism during the era of Johnson, Nixon, Carter and Helms and the impact of the Black Power movement.

 

 

 

War! What is it good for? coverWar! What Is It Good For? Black Freedom Struggles & the U.S. Military, From World War II to Iraq, by Kimberley Phillips. From an array of sources – newspapers, government documents, literature, music and film – the author brings to light how black participation in the nation’s wars after Truman’s 1948 military desegregation order, and the struggle for equal citizenship, galvanized an antiwar movement that reshaped African American struggle for equality.

 

 

Library materials will be available for check out at the Government and Heritage Library by North Carolina State Agency employees or may be borrowed through an interlibrary loan request at your local public library. To view other new library acquisitions, click here.

 

New Additions: Civil Rights History

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New additions to the collections of the Government and Heritage Library:

After the Dream: Black and White Southerners Since 1965, by Timothy Minchin & John Salmond. Beginning where many histories of the civil rights movement end, this book examines the political, social and economic struggles of the movement from 1965 into the 21st century, drawing on newly released archival sources and other primary documents.

 

 

Civil Rights Crossroads: Nation, Community and the Black Freedom Struggle, by Steven Lawson. The author traces the confluence of national and local activism on the civil rights movement, challenging many prevailing views on racial politics. He incorporates contributions from civil rights activists – familiar, unfamiliar, male and female – and examines the movement’s influence on American culture.

 

Toward Freedom Land: The Long Struggle for Racial Equality in America, by Harvard Sitkoff.  An historian with 40 years experience studying race in America, the author recounts the origins and evolution of the civil rights movement. Focusing on key individuals, plus political, economic, and social factors, Sitkoff allows the reader to witness the development of the most important social movement of modern America.

 

 

Library materials will be available for check out at the Government and Heritage Library by North Carolina State Agency employees or may be borrowed through an interlibrary loan request at your local public library. To view other new library acquisitions, click here.

This blog is a service of the State Library of North Carolina, part of the NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. Blog comments and posts may be subject to Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.