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North Carolina History

What’s New about North Carolina in NCpedia?!

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New in NCpedia!

NCpedia has a number of fascinating new stories about North Carolina history and people. Check them out and share!

New in NCpedia: Aerial photograph of the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI), the former site of the NASA tracking station near Rosman, North Carolina. Image courtesy of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

Aerial photograph of the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI), the former site of the NASA tracking station near Rosman, North Carolina. Image courtesy of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

North Carolina in the era of space exploration

Did you know that North Carolina was home to a NASA satellite tracking facility during the peak years of the space program?  Yes, it’s true!  Check out this new entry on the site, located near Rosman, North Carolina: ncpedia.org/NASA-rosman-satellite-tracking-facility.  And on May 8 of this year, the site was recognized with the dedication of the state’s newest Highway Historical Marker (located just off NC Highway 64 near Rosman).

History of Nursing in North Carolina

NCpedia has been building a collection on the history of professional nursing in the state, along with some of the pioneering nurses that made ground-breaking history in the development of nursing education and in bringing modern healthcare to communities. Visit the collection here: ncpedia.org/category/subjects/nurses

New in NCpedia: Kellis Parker, senior year portrait, 1964. From the UNC-Chapel Hill student yearbook the <i>Yackety Yack</i>. Used by permission of University of North Carolina Libaries.

Kellis Parker, senior year portrait, 1964. From the UNC-Chapel Hill student yearbook the Yackety Yack. Used by permission of University of North Carolina Libraries.

Biography of Kellis Earl Parker, lawyer, activist, scholar, and musician

Learn about the life and accomplishments of Lenoir County native, Kellis Earl Parker.  With civil rights activism a central part of his life’s work, Parker was one of the first black students to enroll at the University of North Carolina and went on to become the first black law professor at Columbia University.  He was also an accomplished musician and brother to legendary saxophone player, Maceo Parker. ncpedia.org/parker-kellis-earl

Kelly Agan, North Carolina Government & Heritage Library

New in NCpedia: North Carolina Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) Timeline

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North Carolina Historically Black Colleges & Universities HBCUs. Click here for the NCpedia North Carolina HBCUs Timeline

Click here for the NCpedia North Carolina HBCUs Timeline

New in NCpedia: North Carolina Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) Timeline

NCpedia has a new interactive timeline! 

Tracing the history of North Carolina’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), it brings together brief histories of North Carolina’s twelve HBCUs, developed between 1865 and 1910, and images from a range of collections and historic publications.

The timeline was developed by Christine Alston, a student in the Master of Library and Information Studies program at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, during her recent graduate student field experience at the N.C. Government & Heritage Library. The timeline was created using TimeMapper. An open-source application created by Open Knowledge Labs, TimeMapper is freely available and is built on relatively simple web technologies. The timeline is generated from information entered into a simple Google spreadsheet template (provided by TimeMapper) and run on the web. Virtually anyone from professionals, to teachers, students and family historians can create visually interesting and interactive timelines. No programming experience needed!

Click here for the NCpedia North Carolina HBCUs Collection

Click here for the NCpedia North Carolina HBCUs Collection

Check out the timeline and more NCpedia resources on African American history and education in North Carolina:

 

Kelly Agan, N.C. Government & Heritage Library

 

 

Newspapers and North Carolina History

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Find out about new additions to the collections of the Government and Heritage Library:

incognitoConfederate Incognito: The Civil War Reports of “Long Grabs” a.k.a. Murdoch John McSween, 26th and 35th North Carolina Infantry, E.B. Munson, Ed.  Murdoch John McSween lived from 1836-1880 and writing under the pseudonym “Long Grabs” served as the unofficial war correspondent to the Fayetteville Observer (North Carolina). What he wrote was varied, from fighting in eastern Carolina and Virginia, the condition of soldiers, civilian hardship, and the history of places he visited. Court-martialed and later released to fight in the 26th Regiment, he survived the war to become the editor and publisher of the Eagle newspaper.

 

 

 

 

newspaperimagsA History of Rocky Mount Newspapers, 1872-1932, by Stephan Raper. The author recounts the history of Rocky mount newspapers, essentially a history of the community and its people. Each title’s publishing history is described, including identification of the people behind the presses. In addition, background information on the early history of newspapers in North Carolina is presented.

 

 

 

 

danielsJosephus Daniels: His Life and Times, by Lee Craig. This book tells the story of a fascinating, ambitious newspaper editor and how he revolutionized the newspaper industry in the South, forever changing the relationship between politics and the news media.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Library materials will be available for check out at the Government and Heritage Library by North Carolina State Agency employees or may be borrowed through an inter-library loan request at your local public library. To view other new library acquisitions, click here.

State Doc Pick of the Week : Living history classroom : an educational service of the Tryon Palace Restoration

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Living History ClassroomLooking for lessons or activities for your students that explore North Carolina history and culture? The Living History Classroom is published twice a year by the Tyron Palace Foundation and is available free of charge to schools and teachers. Issues include articles, short stories, puzzles and activities that utilize observational and critical thinking, research and discussion skills while celebrating the resources of Tryon Palace and its North Carolina History Center as well as New Bern and eastern North Carolina. The spring 2013 issue is all about food- how it’s produced, stored and prepared. It contains articles on learning how food was eaten before forks, spoons and plates; kitchen tools; North Carolina’s early experiences with beekeeping; barbecue facts; and how kitchen recipes evolved through combining America’s native foods with those brought to the states by African slaves and European settlers. Each issue contains a guide to show how each article and activity can align with the current grade-appropriate North Carolina Standard Course of Study. This issue is designed with the 4th-grade classroom in mind.

This publication can be downloaded, printed, saved, and viewed by clicking here.

This blog is a service of the State Library of North Carolina, part of the NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. Blog comments and posts may be subject to Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.