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North Carolina

NC County of the Week: Graham County

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This week’s NC County of the Week is Graham County, North Carolina! Named for U.S. senator and governor, William A. Graham. It was formed in 1872 from Cherokee County County.

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This week (August 10 – 16) we’ll highlight the people, history, geography, and natural heritage of this county located in the Mountains of North Carolina.

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter and join in the conversation by using the hashtag #nccotw. Also, visit our Pinterest board about Graham County!

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ncghl
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/ncghl/graham-county-nc/
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/ncpedia

 

State Doc Pick of the Week : North Carolina and the two World Wars

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worldwars

North Carolina and the Two World Wars gives an overview of North Carolina’s involvement in the two major events that changed the world in the twentieth-century. This book is a combination of the two most popular titles published by the Historical Publications Section of the North Carolina Office of Archives and History- Dr. Sarah McCulloh Lemmon’s North Carolina’s Role in the First World War (1966), and North Carolina’s Role in World War II (1964). Dr. Nancy Smith Midgette of Elon University  updated and expanded on these out-of-print documents, as well as adding a new chapter of her own.

This publication can be downloaded and viewed from inside the State Library building here, or is available for purchase through the NC Historic Publications Shop here.

State Doc Pick of the Week : Tar Heel state: a leaflet of interesting information about North Carolina

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tarheel stateIn honor of back-to-school season, put on your thinking cap and see if you are familiar with these facts about North Carolina. Do you know where the state nickname “Tar Heel” came from? Do you know what the state motto is? Or, do you know what the importance of the two dates on the state flag are? If you are unsure, consult this publication from 1945 and brush up on some interesting facts about North Carolina.

This publication can be downloaded, printed, saved, and viewed by clicking here.

New Additions: North Carolina Places Revisited

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New additions to the collections of the Government and Heritage Library:

27 Views of Chapel Hill: A Southern University Town in Prose and Poetry. Through a diverse collection of 27 stories and poems local writers celebrate Chapel Hill and all that ‘makes the southern part of heaven so heavenly.’

 

Durham: In Changing Light, by John Zager.  With over 125 images, the history of Durham, North Carolina is brought to life through views of its landmarks and neighborhoods. Along with a chronological account of the city’s development, the author tells the story of how the city reinvented itself.

Portraits of the African-American Experiences in Concord-Cabarrus, North Carolina, 1860-2008, by Bernard Davis. This work is a history of noted African Americans, events, landmarks and lesser know Black history facts from Concord and Cabarrus County, North Carolina. It brings to life the experiences of slavery, segregation, discrimination and the achievements of African-Americans between 1860 and 2008.

The Research Triangle: From Tobacco Road to Global Prominence, by William M. Rohe.  Bringing to light key actors in its development, this book traces the history of  Research Triangle Park, one of the nation’s largest and most prominent research and development campuses, and the role it has played in transforming an entire region.

 

Thanks to generous donations from North Carolina citizens, these items will be available for check out at the Government and Heritage Library by North Carolina State Agency employees or may be borrowed through an interlibrary loan request at your local public library. To view other new library acquisitions, click here.

 

This blog is a service of the State Library of North Carolina, part of the NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. Blog comments and posts may be subject to Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.